Sunday, March 25, 2007

Something New

Hi Knitters,

I bought a couple of weavettes and an instruction book from Purl a little while ago. Any type of old-fashioned craft interests me and these looms were brought back into production after being discovered by Lisia Conforti in her grandmother's house. Her father immediately remembered how to thread and weave on this little loom. As a child he had made baby blankets, seat covers and afghans with the woven squares. I am enchanted by this sweet story, so I finally found some time to give it a try.
I used some leftover Noro Kureyon (pronounced crayon, remember?). It was trickier to thread the loom than I thought. I am usually pretty quick to pick up stuff like this, but it took a lot of looking and checking and even some correcting after the fact. I love the way this 6-inch square turned out. The fabric is fine, light as a feather. It is beautiful on both sides and I love the picot edging effect. I don't know what I will do with it, but something may come of it. What a fun distraction for a Saturday afternoon. You should give this one a try.

I got a bunch of new books in the mail from amazon last week. I have a few more on the way and I am waiting on pins and needles for a few releases this spring. I will keep you posted on my new arrivals and will be sure to highlight all of the goodies I find.
Okay, I am only going to say this once (you know I am laughing right now), and I hesitate because I really love, love, love No Sheep For You, by Amy R. Singer, but here it goes:
Why, dear heaven above, why the naked knitter? I am such a modest soul that this picture makes me cringe. I don't want to see naked people on my beloved knitting book covers, and I don't want to see naked knitting, ever. Sorry, it had to be said.
Can you imagine showing up for this photo shoot, a sweet looking, wholesome, beautiful young model, and they hand you this little knitted fabric on needles and tell you this is what you are wearing for the cover shot? I would have run for the door (I realize no one would ever ask me to knit naked under any circumstances, but I can pretend, right?) I know they are being cheeky about the itchy wool thing and I get it, really I do, and the model is adorable and courageous.
That's it, this topic is closed and will never be mentioned again. It's over. This is a terrific book and I love to knit with other fibers than wool. Amy Singer is the queen of no-wool knitting due to her allergy to wool and she does a top-notch job with this book. It is informational and the patterns are outstanding. Just take a look at some of my favorite patterns in here. This is a beautiful lace shawl made in Handmaiden Silken, oo-la-la! Tuscany is truly lovely and designed by the one and only Amy R. Singer herself. I must make this, absolutely no question. Beautifully done.
Remember my love for Banff? Well, my love for Morrigan wasn't a surprise when I found out the same designer here was the creator of Banff. That would be Jenna Wilson and wow, is she a talent. This sweater is complicated with about 4 pages dedicated to charts and abbreviations of those charts. It is knit out of Rowan's Calmer, which I have always wanted to try but haven't yet. This would be an achievement to knit to completion. Maybe someday.
You know what I love about this picture? I love the traditional little college prep cardigan on the girl with the head full of dreadlocks. This is great and she is really cute. What a beautiful sweater, perfect lines, sleeves, everything. It is called Cables and O's and is designed by Brooke Snow. The yarn is Queensland Collection Cotolino, a linen and cotton blend. Great design Brooke.
This final pattern, Tomato, is written by the wonderful Wendy Bernard who writes one of my favorite blogs. She is such fun and her designs never miss. She has her own book coming out soon with Stewart, Tabori and Chang and I can't wait for that one. This is such a cute sweater, I just love it. I would definitely wear a cami or something under it, the neck is a little low for me, the modest one. It is knit out of one of the best yarns on the market, Blue Sky Alpacas Dyed Cotton, which I use extensively in Itty-Bitty Nursery. It is luscious, beautiful cotton and you have to try it.
I appreciate the variety of models in the book, they look like beautiful, real women, not just skin and bones. That's the best to see. Interweave and Amy Singer strike again on that subject, they are wonderful.
You should check out No Sheep for You. Great title, fantastic patterns. I could have included so many more patterns that I want to knit like socks, a bag, men's sweaters, and much more. This book is a winner all-around even with the you-know-what on the cover. See I told you I would never mention it again.
best, susie


peaknits said...

Thank you for serving up yet another full plate of inspiration - what great projects and the "weave-ette" is amazing. I have a skein of the handmaiden and wondered what to do - but that Tuscany leaves me breathless. Of course, I'd need a solid skein now:) Darn.

I'm with you on the cover situation - but I won't mention it.

Spincerely said...

I agree, I bought No Sheep for You and I don't regret it at all. What I like is that there is no space wasted on basic knitting instructions. Instead there is a great compilation of useful information on non-wool fibers. I am currently making Tomato, btw...
I also have some Weavettes, though I have not used them in a while. I should take those guys back out and play with them again.
You know, I work in yarn shop where we sell Noro Kureyon and we always pronounce it with 3 syllables. So it is really pronounced just like "crayon"? Who would have guessed! Thanks for the helpful tip!

Anonymous said...

In Japanese, kureyon is pronounced with three syllables-- ku-re-yon!